Madrigal (6b)

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Mon docte Peletier le temps leger s’enfuit,
Je change nuict et jour de poil et de jeunesse :
Mais je ne change pas l’amour d’une maistresse,
Qui dans mon coeur collée eternelle me suit.Toi qui es dés enfance en tout sçavoir instruit
(Si de nostre amitié l’antique neud te presse)
Comme sage et plus vieil, donne moy quelque adresse
Pour eviter ce mal, qui ma raison seduit.

Aide moy, Peletier, si par Philosophie
Ou par le cours des Cieux tu as jamais appris
Un remede d’amour, dy-le moy je te prie.

De l’arbre à Jupiter, qui fut jadis en prix,
De nos premiers ayeuls la vieille Prophetie,
Tu aurois11 à bon droit la couronne et le pris
D’avoir par le conseil de tes doctes escris
Sauvé de ton amy la franchise et la vie.

 
 
                                                                      My learned Peletier, swift time is rushing by,
                                                                      And my skin and youth are losing their freshness night and day;
                                                                      But my love for my mistress is not losing its freshness,
                                                                      She who, stuck to my heart, eternally pursues me.                                                                      You have been instructed in all learning since childhood:
                                                                      If the old tie of our friendship urges you,
                                                                      As a wise man and my elder, give me some skill
                                                                      To ward off this evil which seduces my reason.

                                                                      Help me, Peletier, if through philosophy
                                                                      Or in the courts of Heaven you have ever learned
                                                                      Of a cure for love, tell me it I beg you!

                                                                      From the tree of Jupiter, which was formerly prized
                                                                      By our first ancestors as the ancient [means of] prophecy,
                                                                      You should rightly take the crown and reward
                                                                      For having, through the counsel of your learned writings,
                                                                      Saved your friend’s liberty and life.

 
 
Remy Belleau notes: “he addresses this sonnet to Jacques Peletier of Le Mans, doctor of medicine, among the most well-versed men of our times in poetry and mathematics”. The ‘tree of Jupiter’ refers to the oracle at Dodona, where Jupiter gave messages through an oak tree.
 
Here, again, Blanchemain offers a sonnet under the title ‘Madrigal’, though again offers variants that ‘make the sonnet into a madrigal’. In his variant (the text above) he changes “auroit” in line 13 to “auras” – ‘You shall rightly take the crown’. Otherwise the text is identical down to line 11 (the first 3 ‘stanzas’), and Blanchemain then rounds off with a tercet instead of the 5-line stanza above:
 
 
Car bien qu‘ores au ciel ton coeur soit élevé,
Si tu as quelquefois  d‘une dame esté pris,
Eh ! pour Dieu, conte moi comme tu t‘es sauvé !
 
                                                                      For, though now your heart is elevated to the heavens,
                                                                      If you have sometimes been captivated by a lady,
                                                                      Ah, for goodness’ sake, tell me how you freed yourself!
 
 
 
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About fattoxxon

Who am I? Lover of all sorts of music - classical, medieval, world (anything from Africa), world-classical (Uzbek & Iraqi magam for instance), and virtually anything that won't be on the music charts... Lover of Ronsard's poetry (obviously) and of sonnets in general. Reader of English, French, Latin & other literature. And who is Fattoxxon? An allusion to an Uzbek singer - pronounce it Patahan, with a very plosive 'P' and a throaty 'h', as in 'khan')

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