Sonnet 1

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It’s been too long since my last post!  Not quite back in the swing of things, but let’s start the Helen sonnets.

Ce premier jour de May, Helene, je vous jure
Par Castor par Pollux, vos deus freres jumeaux,
Par la vigne enlassee à l’entour des ormeaux,
Par les prez par les bois herissez de verdure,
 
Par le nouveau Printemps fils aisné de Nature,
Par le cristal qui roule au giron des ruisseaux,
Par tous les rossignols, miracle des oiseaux,
Que seule vous serez ma derniere aventure.
 
Vous seule me plaisez, j’ay par election,
Et non à la volee aimé vostre jeunesse :
Aussi je prens en gré toute ma passion,
 
Je suis de ma fortune autheur, je le confesse :
La vertu m’a conduit en telle affection,
Si la vertu me trompe adieu belle Maistresse.
 
 
 
                                                                                  On this first day of May, Helene, I swear to you
                                                                                  By Castor and by Pollux, your two twin brothers,
                                                                                  By this vine laced about the elms,
                                                                                  By the meadows, by the woods bristling with greenery,
 
                                                                                  By the new Spring, eldest son of Nature,
                                                                                  By the crystal waters tumbling in the lap of the streams,
                                                                                  By all nightingales, the miracle among birds, – [I swear]
                                                                                  That you alone shall be my last affair.
 
                                                                                  You alone please me: I have, by choice
                                                                                  Not by some sudden impulse, fallen in love with your youth;
                                                                                  And too I wish for all my passion,
 
                                                                                  I am the author of my fortune, I confess it:
                                                                                  But virtue brought me into such a state of love;
                                                                                  If virtue deceives me, then farewell fair mistress.
 
 
 
 
In Blanchemain’s version, the second quatrain has a number of changes:
 
 
Par le Printemps sacré, fils aisné de Nature,
Par le sablon qui roule au giron des ruisseaux,
Par tous les rossignols, miracle des oiseaux,
Qu’autre part je ne veux chercher autre aventure.
 
                                                                                  By holy Spring, eldest son of Nature,
                                                                                  By the sand tumbling in the lap of the streams,
                                                                                  By all nightingales, the miracle among birds, – [I swear]
                                                                                  That I shall try to gain no other elsewhere.
 
 
 
He also footnotes an alternative for the penultimate line:
 
 
La vertu qui vous pleige en est la caution
 
                                                                                  But the virtue I pledge to you is what safeguards it;
 
 
 
 
 
 
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About fattoxxon

Who am I? Lover of all sorts of music - classical, medieval, world (anything from Africa), world-classical (Uzbek & Iraqi magam for instance), and virtually anything that won't be on the music charts... Lover of Ronsard's poetry (obviously) and of sonnets in general. Reader of English, French, Latin & other literature. And who is Fattoxxon? An allusion to an Uzbek singer - pronounce it Patahan, with a very plosive 'P' and a throaty 'h', as in 'khan')

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