Amours 2:54

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Quiconque voudra suivre Amour ainsi que moy,
Celuy se delibere en penible tristesse
Vivre comme je vy, il pleust à la Déesse
Qui tient Cypre en ses mains, d’ordonner telle loy.
 
Apres avoir souffert les maux que je reçoy,
Il mourra de langueur, et sa fiere maistresse,
Le voyant trespassé sautera de liesse,
Se moquant du tombeau du mort et de sa foy.
 
Allez donc Amoureux faire service aux Dames,
Offrez leur pour present et vos corps et vos ames,
Vous en receverez un salaire bien doux.
 
« Je croy que Dieu les feit à fin de nuire à l’homme :
« Il les feit (Pardaillan) pour nostre malheur, comme
« Les Tygres les Lions les Serpens et les Loups.
 
 
 
                                                                            Whoever would like to follow Love as I do,
                                                                            Let him plan to live like I live,
                                                                            In vexed sadness ; for it pleases the goddess
                                                                            Who holds Cyprus in her hands to ordain this law.
 
                                                                            Having suffered the ills which I receive
                                                                            He will die of weakness and his proud mistress,
                                                                            Seeing him dead, will leap with happiness
                                                                            Mocking the dead man’s tomb and his faithfulness.
 
                                                                            So go on, lovers, do service to your ladies,
                                                                            Offer them your souls and bodies as a gift,
                                                                            You will receive a sweet payment :
 
                                                                            “I believe God made them to destroy man,
                                                                            He made them, Pardaillan, for our misfortune, like
                                                                            Tigers, lions, serpents and wolves.”

 
 
Ronsard in frustrated mood again, finding yet another way of complaining about a lover’s ills – and particularly, of course, about how he (Ronsard) is the most ill-served of all!  (The goddess of Cyprus is Venus.)
 
The Pardaillan family was an ancient one even in Ronsard’s time; though its most famous representative was still to make his mark – Antoine-Arnaud de Pardaillan de Gondrin, who commanded the king’s armies in Picardy, Savoy and Spain at the end of the century and raised the family to the marquisate, was son of Hector de Pardaillan, who is Ronsard’s addressee.
 
Blanchemain’s earlier version is considerably different in detail, though none of Ronsard’s later amendments really change the content. Note however how line 8’s older version switches the ‘faithfulness’/’loyalty’ under consideration – hers not his; and how in line 11, by adjusting the spelling of the future tense “recev(e)rez”, Ronsard re-balances the motion of the entire line!
 
 
Quiconque voudra suivre Amour ainsi que moy,
Celuy se delibere en penible tristesse
Mourir ainsy que moy : il pleut à la déesse
Qui tient Cypre en ses mains, d’ordonner telle loy.
 
Apres avoir souffert maint deuil et maint emoy,
Il lui faudra mourir, et sa fiere maistresse,
Le voyant au tombeau, sautera de liesse,
Sur le corps trespassé pour luy garder sa foy.
 
Allez donc maintenant faire service aux dames,
Offrez-leur pour present et vos corps et vos ames,
Et vous en recevrez un salaire bien doux !
 
Je croy que Dieu les feit à fin de nuire à l’homme :
Il les feit, Pardaillan, pour nostre malheur comme
Les tigers, les lions, les serpens et les lous.
 
 

 
                                                                            Whoever would like to follow Love as I do,
                                                                            Let him plan to die like I do,
                                                                            In vexed sadness ; for it pleases the goddess
                                                                            Who holds Cyprus in her hands to ordain this law.
 
                                                                            Having suffered much grief and much distress
                                                                            He will have to die, and his proud mistress,
                                                                            Seeing him in the tomb, will leap with happiness
                                                                            On the corpse which died to preserve her loyalty.
 
                                                                            So go on now, do service to your ladies,
                                                                            Offer them your souls and bodies as a gift,
                                                                            And you will receive a sweet payment :
 
                                                                            I believe God made them to destroy man,
                                                                            He made them, Pardaillan, for our misfortune, like
                                                                            Tigers, lions, serpents and wolves.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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About fattoxxon

Who am I? Lover of all sorts of music - classical, medieval, world (anything from Africa), world-classical (Uzbek & Iraqi magam for instance), and virtually anything that won't be on the music charts... Lover of Ronsard's poetry (obviously) and of sonnets in general. Reader of English, French, Latin & other literature. And who is Fattoxxon? An allusion to an Uzbek singer - pronounce it Patahan, with a very plosive 'P' and a throaty 'h', as in 'khan')

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